Use Your Failures to Inspire Others

Use Your Failures to Inspire Others

It would be easy to think the best leaders are those who have a track record of uninterrupted success. Accepting that as a pressing truth, many leaders feverishly work to cover up failures and magnify their successes.

A Leadership Mistake You Don’t Want to Make

A Leadership Mistake You Don’t Want to Make

If you’re a leader it may surprise you to hear that many of the people you lead think you know exactly what the future looks like. The problem is they don’t think you’re telling them because you’re afraid they won’t like the future you have planned.

In light of this amazing reality, it’s a good idea to tell everyone in the organization where you’re going. A failure to do so is a mistake you don’t want to make. It’s crucial you repeatedly share the blow your socks off vision. Fill in as much detail as possible, but be careful to only tell what you know while honestly admitting what you don’t know. If the picture is fuzzy, admit it. Tell them you can’t fill in the missing gaps or pull off the dream without their help.

Lead Through Failure

Lead Through Failure

A lot of men think the best leaders are those who have a track record of uninterrupted successes. With that in mind they feverishly work to cover up past failures and magnify every success. And yet, nothing inspires others more than seeing a man who not only won a few battles but lost a few as well.

Do You Know When to Leave?

Do You Know When to Leave?

It may be you need to know if God is releasing you from your job or some other responsibility. Such times can be agonizing when it’s unclear if the move you’re considering is wise and if the timing is right. If you’re in that situation, I’d suggest there are four lights that must be green before you move on.

How To Strengthen Your Influence

How To Strengthen Your Influence

Values are not practices. A practice is an activity or action. A practice that works in one situation may not work in another because practices apply to specific situations. Because my second son, David, loved to be with people, sending him to his room when he misbehaved resulted in a transformed attitude on his part. When I tried that same form of discipline with my third son, Paul, it didn’t work at all. Why? Because Paul loved sitting at his desk and playing computer games. Make no mistake about it, we’ve got to adapt our practices to the various challenges we face.